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Ivan Krylov

a.k.a. Ivan Andreevich Krylov (Kriloff)

Author Code: RIAK

Born: Feb. 14, 17968 - Moscow, Russia

Died: Nov.21, 1844 - Saint Petersburg, Russia

As a young man, Krylov worked for the civil service until the death of his mother in 1788. In 1783, he sold a comedy to a publisher, but it was never published. With the money received, he purchased the works of Moliere, Racine and Boileau, and these doubtless influenced his own plays. In 1789, Krylov made three attempts at starting literary magazines, but was basically unsuccessful. Nevertheless, his reputation for producing comedies helped to establish him in literary circles. In 1797, he lived at the estate of Prince Galatzin and also accompanied him to Livonia as his secretary, when the Prince was appointed military governor. Krylov resigned his position in 1803 and spent the next three years travelling around Russia. In 1806, he went to Moscow and showed his translation of some of La Fontaine's Fables to Ivan Dmitriev. Dmitriev encouraged him to write some more. For the time being he returned to Saint Petersburg and produced some successful plays. In 1809 he published a collection of 23 tales that were so successful that he decided to give up drama. In 1812, he joined the Imperial Public Library as an assistant, but quickly became head of the Russian Books Department. In 1811, he was admitted to the Russian Academy of Sciences. He continued to write, and, by the end of his career, had published some 200 fables. He retired from the library in 1841. He suffered a cerebral hemorrhage and was taken by the Empress to recover at Pavlosk Palace. He passed away in 1844. His other works include Philomela (1795), The Evil of Shortsight (1800), The Americans (1800), Ready to Oblige (1801), The Fashion Shop (1807), A Lesson for the Daughters (1807) and Ilya the Bogatyr (1807).

eBook Code Title/Sub-Title Pub. Yr Pages File Size Type Download Format Find Printed Copy
RIAK001 Kriloff's Fables - Verse
  The Aged Lion
  The Ant
  The Ape
  Apelles and the Young Ass
  The Ass and the Nightingale
  The Barred
  The Bear Among the Bees
  The Boy and the Snake
  The Brook
  The Chest
  The Cloud
  The Cock and the Pearl
  The Cornflower
  The Cuckoo and the Eagle
  Demyan's Fish Soup
  The Division
  The Ducat
  The Eagle and the Bee
  The Eagle and the Fowls
  The Eagle and the Mole
  The Eagle and the Spider
  The Elephant and the Pug
  The Elephant As Governor
  The False Accusation
  The Finch and the Pigeon
  The Fly and the Bee
  Fortune and the Beggar
  The Fox and the Marmot
  The Fox
  The Frog and the Ox
  The Funeral
  The Geese
  The Gnat and the Shepherd
  The Grandee
  The Hare At the Hunt
  The Hermit and the Bear
  The Impious
  The Kite
  The Lamb
  The Leaves and the Roots
  The Liar
  The Lion and the Fox
  The Lion and the Panther
  The Lion, the Chamois and the Fox
  The Man and His Shadow
  The Man with Three Wives
  The Merchant
  The Mice in Council
  The Mirror and the Monkey
  The Miser
  The Mistress and Her Two Maids
  The Monkey and the Spectacles
  The Mouse and the Rat
  The Nightingales
  The Oak and the Reed
  The Oracle
  The Parishioner
  The Peasant and the Robber
  The Peasant and the Sheep
  The Peasant and the Snake
  The Peasant in Trouble
  The Peasants and the River
  The Pike and the Cat
  The Pike
  The Pond and the River
  The Quartet
  The Raven and the Fox
  The Sack
  The Sheep and the Dogs
  The Sightseer
  The Slanderer and the Snake
  The Snake and the Lamb
  The Sportsman
  The Steed and His Rider
  The Swan, the Pike and the Crayfish
  The Swimmer and the Sea
  Three Peasants
  The Tree
  Trishka's Coat
  Two Casks
  Two Peasants
  The Wolf and the Cat
  The Wolf and the Stork
  The Wolf in the Kennel
  The Wolves and the Sheep
  The Workman and the Peasant
c. 1820 104 313k eBook Download PDF - 'Kriloff's Fables - Verse' (RIAK001)   Download ePub - 'Kriloff's Fables - Verse' (RIAK001) Find a printed copy of Kriloff's Fables - Verse by Ivan Krylov at AbeBooks

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