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Paracelsus *

a.k.a. Phillipus Aureolus, Theostratus Bombastus von Hohenheim

Author Code: OPAR

Born: Dec. 17, 1493 - Einsiedeln, Switzerland

Died: Sep. 24, 1541 - Salzburg, Austria

The son of a well-known physician, Paracelsus was educated at the University of Vienna and the University of Basle, where he studied surgery, medicine and alchemy. His interest in alchemy began at an early age and, by the time he was sixteen, he was familiar with the majority of works on the subject. He left Basle in 1516 and travelled throughout Europe. Captured by the Tartars, he spent time with them as a favorite of the Grand Cham and accompanied the Cham's son to China and Constantinople where it is said he learned the secret of the alkahest from an Arabian. He returned to Europe and took a position as an army surgeon. In 1526, he became a professor of physics, medicine and surgery and coined the term zinc for the metallic element. In 1536, he published The Great Surgery Book, which was widely popular and established his reputation. He is also credited with the introduction of the opiate Laudanum and the discovery of the effects of ether. Paracelsus was considered arrogant by his contemporaries and this resulted in problems throughout his career. There is no doubt that he was ahead of his time in medical procedures and diagnosis. After his death, many of his theories became common practice in medicine. His other works include Syphillus and Venereal Diseases (1530) and Theatrum Chemicum (1602 posthumous) in addition to other papers on alchemy and medicine which formed part of his collected works (1922 posthumous).

eBook Code Title/Sub-Title Pub. Yr Pages File Size Type Download Format Find Printed Copy
OPAR002 The Coelum Philosophorum c. 1520 23 358k eBook Download PDF - 'The Coelum Philosophorum' (OPAR002) Find a printed copy of The Coelum Philosophorum by Paracelsus * at AbeBooks
OPAR003 The Tincture of the Philosophers c. 1520 12 338k eBook Download PDF - 'The Tincture of the Philosophers' (OPAR003) Find a printed copy of The Tincture of the Philosophers by Paracelsus * at AbeBooks
OPAR001 The Treasure of Treasures for Alchemists c. 1510 6 305k eBook Download PDF - 'The Treasure of Treasures for Alchemists' (OPAR001) Find a printed copy of The Treasure of Treasures for Alchemists by Paracelsus * at AbeBooks

Note: An Asterisk (*) after an author´s name signifies that this is a Pseudonym



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