AUTHORS A
   A   
B
   B   
C
   C   
D
   D   
 E
   E   
 F
   F   
 G
   G   
 H
   H   
 I
   I   
 J
   J   
 K
   K   
 L
   L   
 M
   M   
 N
   N   
 O
   O   
 P
   P   
 Q
   Q   
 R
   R   
 S
   S   
 T
   T   
 U
   U   
 V
   V   
 W
   W   
 X
   X   
 Y
   Y   
 Z
   Z   
 ALL
 ALL 
SEARCH TERM
SEARCH BY
CLASSIFICATION
CATEGORY
      
AUTHORS BY NATIONALITY
CLASSIFICATIONS
Art/Design & Architecture
Astronomy
Biography & Autobiography
Biology & Natural History
Chemistry
Children's Literature
Cooking & Cuisine
Drama & Romantic Fiction
Ecology & Environment
Economics & Finance
Education
Folklore/Mythology/Fantasy
General Reference
General Science
Geology/Mineralogy/Palaeont.
Historical Fiction
History
Horror/Supernatural/Occult
Humour & Satire
Language & Linguistics
Literary Criticism/Analysis
Mathematics
Medicine & Physiology
Military & War
Music
Mystery/Crime/Espionage
Philosophy, Ethics & Logic
Physics
Poetry
Politics, Government & Law
Psychology & Psychiatry
Religion & Theology
Science & Future Fiction
Sociology/Society/Anthropology
Sports, Hobbies & Games
Travel & Geography
Western Fiction

Eugene Francois Vidocq

Author Code: FEFV

Born: Jul. 24, 1775 - Arras, France

Died: May 11, 1857 - Paris, France

From an early age Vidocq was rowdy and incorrigible. He was in jail already at the age of thirteen and his teenage years saw him in a number of theatrical jobs, interspersed with thievery. In 1791, he enlisted in the Bourbon Regiment and subsequently took part in battles during the war with Austria; he also took part in numerous duels. He left the army and returned to Arras in 1793 and, the following year, spent twelve months in prison for duelling. During the years up to 1800, Vidocq was in and out of jail and travelled all over Europe. He returned to Arras, but was soon in trouble again. Finally, in 1809, he became a police informant and more or less changed sides. He was released from prison in 1811 and helped to organize the Brigade de la Surete, a plainclothes police unit. In 1813, it had its name changed to Surete Nationale and from then until his resignation in 1827, he helped to drastically reduce the crime rate in Paris. He used a ghostwriter to produce his memoirs which were published in 1828. In 1833, Vidocq found the Office of Information, a private detective/police agency, considered to be the first of its kind. Vidocq, however, was unable to stay out of prison and spent almost a year there in 1842. Over the next few years he published a number of short works and essays on criminology, past cases, etc. Following the 1848 Revolution, his financial situation deteriorated and in 1849, he found himself again incarcerated, albeit for a short term. His health also began to fail, although his constitution was strong enough to survive a bout of cholera in 1854. Vidocq is considered by many to be the father of modern criminology and a model for many detectives in the works of authors such as Balzac, Poe, Gaboriau and Hugo. His other works include Les Voleurs (1836), Dictionnaire d'Argot (1836), Consideration sommaires sur les prisons, les bagnes et la peine de mort (1844) and Les Chauffeurs du Nord (1845).

eBook Code Title/Sub-Title Pub. Yr Pages File Size Type Download Format Find Printed Copy
FEFV001 Jean Monette 1836 5 110k eBook Download PDF - 'Jean Monette' (FEFV001)   Download ePub - 'Jean Monette' (FEFV001) Find a printed copy of Jean Monette by Eugene Francois Vidocq at AbeBooks

Note: An Asterisk (*) after an author´s name signifies that this is a Pseudonym



Click here To Subscribe
PayPal Acceptance Mark

Terms & Conditions        Privacy Policy

Copyright © 2001-2017. All Rights Reserved eBooks-Library.com