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J. D. Salinger

a.k.a. Jerome David Slainger

Author Code: AJDS

Born: Jan. 1, 1919 - New York City, New York, USA

Died: Jan. 27, 2010 - Cornish, New Hampshire, USA

Educated at various secondary schools in New York, Salinger spent a year at New York University in 1936. He then spent a year-and-a-half working at a company in Vienna, Austria, leaving only a month before Austria was annexed by Nazi Germany. He then returned to America and attended Ursinius College in Pennsylvania and subsequently Columbia University, where he developed his writing skills. One of his teachers was Whit Burnett, the editor of Story magazine, who both encouraged Salinger and also published his first story, The Young Folks, in 1940. The following year he began contributing to the New Yorker, but most of his work was rejected. He was drafted in 1942 and saw combat on D-Day, the Battle of the Bulge and Hurtgen Forest. Salinger met Hemingway in Paris who encouraged him in his writing and the two became friends. Because of Salinger's linguistic abilities, he was assigned to counter-intelligence and interrogated German prisoners. He rose to the rank of staff sergeant and remained in Germany after the war until 1946. He continued to limited success with his stories and it wasn't until 1951, with the publication of The Catcher in the Rye, that Salinger finally arrived on the literary scene. The novel was a huge success and also developed a reputation that resulted in it being banned in may countries. The main character, Holden Caulfield, had appeared in an earlier short story, Slight Rebellion Off Madison, and became a cult hero to young adults. Salinger never again attained the heights of success generated by Catcher, although he continued to publish until 1965. He left behind many unpublished works with instructions on how they should be handled after his death. His other works include Personal Notes of an Infantryman (1942), A Boy in France (1945), A Girl I Knew (1948), Nine Stories (1953), Franny and Zooey (1961), Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenter and Seymour: An Introduction (1963) and Hapworth 16, 1924 (1965).

eBook Code Title/Sub-Title Pub. Yr Pages File Size Type Download Format Find Printed Copy
AJDS003 I'm Crazy 1945 9 166k Article Download PDF - 'I'm Crazy' (AJDS003) Find a printed copy of I'm Crazy by J. D. Salinger at AbeBooks
AJDS001 Personal Notes On an Infantryman 1942 4 144k Article Download PDF - 'Personal Notes On an Infantryman' (AJDS001) Find a printed copy of Personal Notes On an Infantryman by J. D. Salinger at AbeBooks
AJDS002 The Stranger 1945 7 164k Article Download PDF - 'The Stranger' (AJDS002) Find a printed copy of The Stranger by J. D. Salinger at AbeBooks

Note: An Asterisk (*) after an author´s name signifies that this is a Pseudonym



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