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Western Fiction

Floyd Dell

Author Code: AFLD

Born: Jun. 28, 1887 - Barry, Illinois, USA

Died: Jul. 23, 1969 - Bethesda, Maryland, USA

After attending high school in Quincy, Illinois, Dell dropped out before graduating and worked in a factory to help support the family. An avid reader despite his lack of education, Dell began to contribute poems to national magazines such as McClure's and Harper's Weekly. It was also at this time that he joined the Socialist Party. He landed a reporter job with the Tri-City Worker in Davenport and in 198 moved to Chicago where he became editor of the Friday Literary Review. In 1913, he moved to New York and was appointed managing editor of The Masses. Living in Greenwich Village, he became a leader of the Bohemian community. He worked with the Provincetown Players and produced his first play with them - also helping to develop Eugene O'Neill. He became romantically involved with Edna St. Vincent Millay during this time. In the 1910's, Dell was a major force in American literature, but following the death of his parents in the 1920's his career took a downturn. In 1925, he moved to Europe, but returned to America within a year. In 1933, he joined Roosevelt's New Deal as an administrator and was also a ghostwriter for Eleanor Roosevelt. He retired from civil service in 1947 and while his literary career had ended, he continued to contribute articles to periodicals. His works include Moon-Calf (1920), Briary Bush (1921), Janet Marsh (1923), Looking at Life (1924), This Mad Ideal (1925), Runaway (1925), Old Man's Folly (1926), Unmarried Father (1927), Love Without Money (1931), Homecoming (1933) and Golden Spike (1934).

eBook Code Title/Sub-Title Pub. Yr Pages File Size Type Download Format Find Printed Copy
AFLD001 Women as World Builders 1913 24 180k eBook Download PDF - 'Women as World Builders' (AFLD001) Find a printed copy of Women as World Builders by Floyd Dell at AbeBooks

Note: An Asterisk (*) after an author´s name signifies that this is a Pseudonym



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