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Mary White Ovington

Author Code: AMWO

Born: Apr. 11, 1865 - Brooklyn, New York, USA

Died: Jul. 15, 1951 - Newton Highlands, Massachusetts, USA

Educated at Packer Collegiate Institute and Radcliffe College, Ovington came from a family that was active in women's rights and anti-slavery movements. In 1890, she attended a Frederick Douglass lecture and was greatly affected by the experience. She helped to found the Greenpoint Settlement in Brooklyn in 1895 and remained as its head until 1904 when she joined the Greenwich House Committee on Social Investigations as a Fellow. During her time there, she met William Du Bois who further influenced her in the cause of civil rights. She joined the Socialist Party in 1905 and began writing for radical papers and journals. In 1908, she joined forces with William English Walling in founding the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). She became the executive secretary in 1910. In 1911, she published Half a Man: The Status of a Negro in New York, a condemnation of racial prejudice. Ovington served the NAACP as a board member and chairman in a career that spanned 38 years until her retirement due to ill health in 1947. She wrote a number of works on race, socialism, autobiography and contributed numerous articles to periodicals. Her other works include Status of the Negro in the United States (1913), Socialism in the Feminist Movement (1914), The Upward Path (1919), The Shadow (1920), Portraits in Color (1927), Reminiscences (1932) and Walls Come Tumbling Down (1947).

eBook Code Title/Sub-Title Pub. Yr Pages File Size Type Download Format Find Printed Copy
AMWO002 On the New-Time Negro 1912 3 97k Article Download PDF - 'On the New-Time Negro' (AMWO002) Find a printed copy of On the New-Time Negro by Mary White Ovington at AbeBooks
AMWO001 The Shadow 1920 184 688k eBook Download PDF - 'The Shadow' (AMWO001) Find a printed copy of The Shadow by Mary White Ovington at AbeBooks

Note: An Asterisk (*) after an author´s name signifies that this is a Pseudonym



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