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Ida B. Wells-Barnett

a.k.a. Ida Bell (nee) Wells

Author Code: AIBW

Born: Jul. 16, 1862 - Holly Springs, Mississippi, USA

Died: Mar. 25, 1931 - Chicago, Illinois, USA

The daughter of slaves, Wells lost her parents during an outbreak of Yellow Fever in 1876. She left school and began teaching, returning to her education later at Rust College. She moved to Memphis in 1880 and went to Fisk University. A fervent campaigner for civil rights, Wells began to write of her own stand against racism and the atrocities committed against blacks in America, especially cases of lynchings. After three of friends were lynched, Wells left Memphis and moved to Chicago in 1892. That year she published a pamphlet, Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All its Phases, which brought the problems to light for the Northern public. In 1895, she married F. L. Barnett, a Chicago lawyer and newspaper editor, and spent the next few years raising her children. In 1906, she supported the Niagara Movement with W.E.B. DuBois and in 1909 signed the petition that established the NAACP. She toured England on a couple of occasions, lecturing on racial equality. Wells was also one of the first black women to be paid by a white newspaper for her column regarding her trips overseas. In 1910, she founded the Negro Fellowship League and served as its president. Wells was also a leader of the black suffragist movement. In 1930, she ran unsuccessfully for the Illinois State Legislature. In addition to her many newspaper articles, her works include A Red Record (1895), Lynch Law in Georgia (1899), Lynch Law in America (1900) and her autobiography, Crusade for Justice written in 1928, but not published until 1970.

eBook Code Title/Sub-Title Pub. Yr Pages File Size Type Download Format Find Printed Copy
AIBW003 Lynch Law in America 1900 6 135k eBook Download PDF - 'Lynch Law in America' (AIBW003) Find a printed copy of Lynch Law in America by Ida B. Wells-Barnett at AbeBooks
AIBW002 Lynch Law in Georgia 1899 18 177k eBook Download PDF - 'Lynch Law in Georgia' (AIBW002) Find a printed copy of Lynch Law in Georgia by Ida B. Wells-Barnett at AbeBooks
AIBW001 Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All its Phases 1892 19 207k eBook Download PDF - 'Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All its Phases' (AIBW001) Find a printed copy of Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All its Phases by Ida B. Wells-Barnett at AbeBooks

Note: An Asterisk (*) after an author´s name signifies that this is a Pseudonym



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